Sunday, May 8, 2011

Convertible Fenway Mitts (Convertible Mittens)



I have been a lucky girl, and have been to many games at Fenway Park to cheer the Red Sox. It is often really cold so I am an expert at keeping warm during rain delays. Unfortunately this means that my Red Sox gear is covered, so I wanted to think of a way that I could still show my Boston pride while being bundled up. I therefore bring you the Fenway Mitts, convertible mittens with the Red Sox logo. Your hand can stay warm, plus convertible mittens are awesome.


Materials
  • Knitting Needles: 5 - size 3 (3.25 mm) double pointed knitting needles
  • Yarn: 2 balls of Rowan Felted Tweed DK (knit 2 strands at a time), scraps of Telemark Yarn red and white.
  • Gauge: ~6 sts/inch. 8-9 rows/inch
  • Misc: Yarn needle
  • Finished Size: 3.5" wide, 8" cuff to fingertips

The ChartI will provide written instructions below, but I also created a chart of each mitten hand to help you visualize the placement of the chart relative to increases for the thumb. The Red Sox knitting chart on its own is located in a different post (I'm using the Large B.)

Charts of the left (left) and right (right) handed mittens. The charts start (at the bottom) after the completion of the cuff all the way until the first round of decreases. The yellow stitch indicates the picked up stitch (after thumb stitches are set aside.) The pale blue row indicates where on the palm side of the mitten you knit two rows in waste yarn to create the convertible mitten (if you want standard mittens than ignore this row.)

Instructions for Right Hand Convertible Mitten (Glitten) - We are going to create a mitten that has two rows of waste yarn on the palm. Later we are going to cut the waste yarn out, pick up the stitches and knit an overlap to make these mittens convertible.
  • Cast on 44 stitches with double stranded Rowan Felted Tweed (or using a single strand of sport weight wool)
  • Knit in 2x2 ribbing (K2, P2) for 1.5 inches (~13 rows)
  • Knit 4 rounds even
  • Beginning the increases for the thumb: K21 (place marker), Kfb, Kfb, (place marker), K21 (46 sts)
  • K 2 rounds even
  • Begin knitting the Red Sox Chart: Knit the chart pattern to the first maker, Kfb, K2, Kfb (in the stitch before the second marker), K to the end of the row (48 sts)
    The wrong side of the B on the mittens.  I knit the B with a faux-intarsia.  I used 4 strands of white and 2 strands of red and carried these up the knitting.  The floats ended up being really small.  
  • K 2 rows, continue working the B chart on the back of the hand (the first 22 stitches of each round)
  • Increase Row: K chart to the marker, Kfb, K4, Kfb (in the stitch before the second marker), K to the end (50 sts)
  • K 2 rounds even, following the chart on the back of the hand.
  • Continue increases stitches for the thumb, with 2 rounds knit across in between each increase round until there are 56 stitches.
  • K 1 round even (don't forget to continue following the chart for the first 22 stitches!)
  • Slip the 14 stitches in between the two markers onto scrap yarn. These will later become the thumb. (42 stitches)
  • K21 stitches (following the chart), pick up 2 stitches (one from each end of the thumb), K 21 stitches (44 sts)
  • Follow the chart until you reach the row with light blue on the B. Knit the first 22 stitches following the chart (this is the back of your hand.) With waste yarn, knit the last 22 stitches, turn your work and purl 22 stitches (completing two rows with green waste yarn.) With your MC, knit across the waste yarn rows to complete the round.
  • Knit the last 3 rounds of the B chart.
  • K 14 rounds even
  • *K2, K2tog* across ( 33 sts)
  • Knit 5 rounds across
  • *K1, K2tog* across ( 22 sts)
  • K 1 round across
  • k2tog across (11 sts)
  • K2tog 5 times, K1 (6 sts)
  • break yarn and pull through remaining sitches
Instructions for Left Hand Convertible Mitten - Follow the right hand instructions except knit the B chart in the last 22 stitches of the round rather than the first 22 stitches. (This will put the increases for the thumb to the right of the B chart.) The B chart is still on the back of the hand, and waste yarn (at the light blue row in the chart) happens on the first 22 stitches of that round.
Instructions for the Thumb
  • Take the 14 stitches off of waste yarn and put back onto 3 dpn's. (14 sts) Tip: you can always use a smaller needle if you're having trouble picking up the stitches.
  • Pick up 2 stitches on edge closest to the hand (16 sts) and knit 15 rows
  • *K1, K2tog* until last stitch, K1 (11 sts)
  • k 1 row across
  • K2tog across until last stitch, K1 (6 sts)
  • cut yarn and pull through remaining stitches.

Turning the mittens into convertible mittens

  • Pick up 22 stitches on each edge of the waste yarn (on the palm of the mitten) and cut the waste yarn out. (Tip, it is easier to turn the mitten to the wrong side when picking up stitches)

    The stitches have been picked up, and we're ready to cut the waste yarn.


    After cutting the waste yarn, before we start knitting the flaps to keep your hands warm.

  • Starting with the cuff side needle and the mitten right side out, work 2x2 ribbing as follows:
    • RS Row: K2, *P2, K2* repeat from * across (22 sts)
    • WS Row: P2, *K2, P2* repeat from * across
    • for a total of 11 Rows, bind off
  • Finger tip side stitches, work 5 rows in the ribbing pattern pattern, bind off

    The flaps to finish the convertible mittens. The larger flap (cuff side; left) will be sewn into the mitten underneath the finger tip side flap (right)

  • With a single strand of yarn, stitch the sides of these flaps to the sides of the mitten (with the fingertip flap on top of the cuff side flap)
  • Enjoy your convertible Fenway Mitts!

Fenway Convertable Mitts: Closed (left), Open from the back (middle) and open from the palm side (right).

I will admit that I am a bad girl, I still have to finish my second convertible mitten. However, since I am moving away from the greater Boston area, I wanted to get this knitting pattern published as soon as possible as my tribute to Boston.

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Abbreviations Used in this pattern:
K - knit
P - purl
Kfb - increase 1 stitch by knitting into the front and back of a single stitch.

SSK - decrease by slipping two stitches then knitting them together. Alternatively, you could slip one stitch, knit one stitch and pass slipped stitch over.
K2tog - decrease by knitting two stitches together.
MC - Main Color
CC - Contrast Color

This pattern was created by ChemKnits for your Personal or charity use. The charts and directions of this pattern are not to be republished without permission of ChemKnits. © 2011 ChemKnits

37 comments:

  1. We could have used these yesterday during the rain delay! I was cold! Cute glittens!

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  2. these are fantastic!
    i just got word that i'll be on the west coast for my phd program, but i'll make myself a pair of these to keep the fenway love alive!!
    thanks for the great pattern!!

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    1. OR...you could knit a pair with the SF Giants logo (but likely wouldn't have to use them as much here on the Left Coast, haha.). These glittens are great. I visited your beautiful Fenway last year when they played the Cubs for the first time there in over a hundred years. So fun! (poor cubs)

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    2. I love spending time in Fenway.

      You could definitely incorporate any logo (or design) you wanted onto these mitts. Someone made a cabled version with thumb flaps that is very fantastic!

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  3. Caroline, That's exactly why I created these mittens :)

    Chrissy, Congrats on the PhD program. I, too, am moving away from Boston so I want to keep a little piece of Fenway with me.

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  4. These are very cool! I'm currently trying to knit the logo... I'm new to this and was wondering if you could explain to me how to this part.

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  5. Kyla,

    There are two ways for people to incorporate the logo. 1) duplicate stitching after the item is knit (essentially embroidery) and 2) Using a knitting colorwork technique.

    I use a combination of stranded knitting/intarsia. At the bottom of the B, in the first row with red and white stitches, I use two long strands of red/white yarn. I use one strand for each part of the B (to minimize the amount of long carryovers I have after a row.

    For example (second row of the chart):
    I knit 8 sts in blue, wrap the blue with white yarn, Knit 1 with white (strand A), 3 sts with red (A), 1 with white (A). Knit 1 in blue, then 2 with white (B), 1 with red (B) and 1 with white (B). I then finish the round with blue.

    When I knit the rest of the round, I do not carry the red and white strands across. When I start the next row of the chart, I knit the stitches with the color stand that would require the least amount of carry over. Before I start with the first stitch, I always wrap the CC around the MC.

    What I do is really not as complicated as it sounds from my description... I should try to make a video of this at some point to make it a bit clearer... I sincerely hope that I didn't confuse you further. Good luck!

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  6. My son is a huge Boston fan (as we live in New England) I am very excited to make these! Thanks for such a cool pattern. I never knew that making convertible mittens would be so easy! Thanks again.

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  7. You're welcome. Go Red Sox! (I now have to preface "Red" when I used to just say "Sox" because I now live in the White Sox territory. Talk about confusing!)

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  8. I really like these mittens, I am from Idaho and support the Boise Broncos, The B would be perfect. Thank you. I do have another idea how I would like to use your convertible pattern is that I would like to try to incorporate separate fingerless fingers and thumb into this pattern. Thanks for your ideas, they will help me with mine.

    Alison

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  9. I'm glad the B can server multiple purposes! I have a pair of glittens that has fingers inside, and I love them. Send me a picture (chemknitsblog(at)gmail.com) when you're done. I'd love to see them!

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  10. Eve said..
    Did you every get to do the left mitten pattern?
    healtheve@cox.net

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  11. The left hand mitten instructions have always been on the page, but they are not written out since they are nearly identical to the right hand mittens:

    "Instructions for Left Hand Convertible Mitten - Follow the right hand instructions except knit the B chart in the last 22 stitches of the round rather than the first 22 stitches. (This will put the increases for the thumb to the right of the B chart.) The B chart is still on the back of the hand, and waste yarn (at the light blue row in the chart) happens on the first 22 stitches of that round"

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  12. Have you ever tried the flip-top method on a thumb? I want to make these for my aunt, but she texts a lot, and runs with an iPod. Just wondering, do you think the same method of knitting across with scrap yarn to make the hole would work?

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  13. I have not tried making a flip top thumb before, but I would imagine that it would work similarly. I would use scrap yarn, and then add a little flap so that way the thumb would stay warm when not texting. Let me know how it comes out!

    Cheers, Rebecca

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  14. Hi Rebecca,
    I finished the mittens with the flip-top thumb. It worked well, but it was a little difficult, since it's such a small circumference. I think it would be easier with a lighter weight yarn than the one I used, but anyway, they came out great! I Added cable pattern to the back of mittens instead of the B. If you'd like to see them, here's a link to the project page on Ravelry.
    Thanks for the great pattern!

    http://www.ravelry.com/projects/knitazteca/fenway-mitts-convertible-mittens

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    Replies
    1. I had already seen the mittens on Ravelry, and they look AMAZING! (I can see when new photos are added to projects I designed.) I think it is great that you provided instructions for your cables.

      I agree that a flip top thumb would be much easier when knitting with a smaller gauge.

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  15. I am making the mittens, the inside is bulky from the yarn carry overs, could I cover it with batting or what do you suggest. It is the first time I have ever done a design.

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  16. Hello! First, THANK YOU! Love, love, love these mittens! Secondly, what colour of the Rowan Felted Tweed did you use? Thank so much!!

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    Replies
    1. I replied on Facebook first, but I wanted to share my response here, too. "I went back and found my yarn labels (there is a reason why I never throw them out!) and there is no color listed, except for SH133. It is a greyish navy color. (I purchased it over 4 years ago, so it is possible that the exact color is discontinued.)"

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  17. It was your pattern that I used for making mittens for 4 girls that came through my crossing. I am a school crossing guard in Lakeland FL and I reward kids I see being a positive influence to other children.I made 4 pairs in the girl's favorite colors and gave the mittens to them at Christmas. They loved them so much that one girl said her mother wanted hers.

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    1. Thank you for this story. It is really amazing that you make mittens for the kids to encourage positive behavior. I'm glad that you enjoyed the pattern!

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  18. Thank you so much for this pattern! My daughter is one of the few Red Sox fans in NJ and it is next to impossible to find things with the logo. (We usually go to my home state, PA.) These will be perfect for marching band.

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  19. I was so excited to find this project. My son and family are Red Sox fans. These will make great Christmas presents. Could they be made with Worsted weight yarn as well?

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    Replies
    1. Since I knit these with a double strand of DK yarn, worsted yarn should work well. I would just take the time to check your gauge before you start. (Gauge: ~6 sts/inch. 8-9 rows/inch)

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  20. Thank you SO much for this pattern. I have been knitting socks and mittens for quite a while now. My baseball-obsessed boyfriend lived in Boston for 17 years before moving to Maine with me. He was a little jealous watching me knit great gifts for everyone but him. Finally a pair of fun-to-knit mittens he will be proud to wear!

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    1. Wonderful! I love hearing from other fans :0)

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  21. Thank you for providing this pattern! It is exactly what I've been looking for! I really enjoyed the video you did. After watching that, I am more confident that I can knit these mittens. You made it so logical and simple. Much appreciated.

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    1. You're very welcome! The best part is that this technique can be applied to ANY pair of mittens. :)

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  22. I'm looking for some help on the "B" pattern. Do you knit it as fair Isle or intarsia?? I'm way confused! Thanks for your help in advance!

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    1. Good question,

      The pattern is so narrow that I do a sort of fudge intarsia so I can still knit in the round. For each "B", I was knitting with 4 strands of white yarn and 2 strands of red yarn, each travelling up a different section of the pattern. (The floats back across were short enough that it didn't cause too much trouble.) For the next row, I would wrap the CC around the MC in the stitch before I needed to start knitting with the CC again (to prevent pulling of the right most stitch.)

      I will add a picture of the wrong side of the B to the pattern above.


      The following blog post shows a bit what it was like to do the technique:
      http://asatricosa.wordpress.com/2012/03/23/sort-of-intarsia-in-the-round/

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  23. I just posted a long-ish comment asking if I could post a version of this written without the B or the flap on Ravelry as a basic "first-time" mitten recipe... I am not sure if the comment posted though. I just knitted these mittens (well, one of them) without the flap or B and it is the first time I have successfully knitted a mitten. Someone pointed me here after a long, fruitless search on Ravelry for a good pattern for my first mitten. I will be writing up an adapted version of this pattern for my own use in the future, and if I ran it by you and gave you full credit and linked back here, I think it would be a great addition to Ravelry. I have never written a pattern and don't know if this is a super gauche request or not, so please let me know if it is! And I am sorry if I post two versions of this comment.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you for contacting me directly. I am glad that you have enjoyed my designs.

      The notes section of your Ravelry project page is the appropriate place to share your modifications and keep track of any changes you think would be useful for other knitters. If there is something you think would be helpful for me to include on this page please let me know and I'll be happy to add it (giving YOU credit!) I do NOT give permission for my patterns to be re-published on any other website, including creating a new Ravelry pattern.

      I am able to offer the majority of my patterns for free because of the ad revenue visitors to ChemKnits generate. Allowing instructions for one of my most popular designs to be hosted elsewhere would cost me money.

      Best,
      Rebecca from ChemKnits

      P.S. Feel free to post questions here in comments, on the ChemKnits Designs Ravelry Group or on the ChemKnits Facebook Page

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  24. Oh and my original comment also said something along the lines of...

    Thank you so much! This pattern was great and I am super pumped to have FINALLY knitted an entire mitten!!! Thank you for sharing this! I may try the B version soon ;)

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    Replies
    1. You're very welcome!! I'm glad that you liked the design. Feel free to contact me directly through the links above if you have any questions or want to discuss this further.

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