Tuesday, November 2, 2010

How to Knit an I-cord (video)

I-cords are useful for many different knitting patterns. I have utilized them in legs , eyes and wings of some of my free patterns. This knit rope is created by having a few stitches on a needle, and knitting multiple rows without turning your work (or knitting backwards). I hope that the following video will help you with the I-cords you need to create for your projects.

The steps
  1. Cast on the appropriate number of stitches (usually between 3 and 6) on a double pointed needle
  2. Without turning the needle, slide the stitches from the left tip to the right tip.
  3. Knit the first stitch you cast on first, without turning. You may want to pull this stitch tight so you can complete the circle.
  4. Finish the row.
  5. Slide the stitches to the right tip of the needle, without turning, and repeat.

Video 1: Knitting an I-cord with 3 stitches - This video illustrates knitting an I-cord starting with three knit stitches.




Video 2: Knitting an I-cord with 4 stitches - The rules are the same, but this video has 4 stitches in the I-cord.



Knitting Spools
When you were a kid did you ever use a knitting spool? I used to make such long "ropes" that I was planning to use to make a rug. When you're using a 4- or 6- peg knitting spool, you are creating an I-cord! When you use double pointed needles, the reason you knit it flat rather than in the round is that it is difficult to knit in the round with a single stitch on each needle.

In my nostalgia, I found the following knitting spool kits on Amazon.com:



4 comments:

  1. I love I-cord! Lots of applications including whipping up a quick snake to amuse a cat or child. And where would we be without a little healthy amusement.... ;-)

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  2. I don't have any cats, but I do like the idea of an Icord snake as a fast project. There could be some really interesting snakes and eels out of novelty yarns....

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  3. Rebecca, I am not a super creative knitter but when you get almost to the end of your snake you can add a stitch at the beginning & end of each row to give him a more defined head (fatter...). And if you've knit in wool, run him through the wash to firm him up nicely.

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